Tag Archives: Richard Conte

House of Strangers (1949) Joseph L. Mankiewicz, Edward G. Robinson, Susan Hayward, Richard Conte, Crime, Drama, Film-Noir

house-of-strangers-1949
In New York, after seven years in prison, the lawyer Max Monetti goes to the bank of his brothers Joe, Tony and Pietro Monetti and promises revenge to them. Then he visits his lover Irene Bennett that asks him to forget the past and start a new life. Max recalls the early 30s, when he is the favorite son of his father Gino Monetti, who has a bank in the East Side. Gino is a tyrannical and egocentric self-made man that raises his family in an environment of hatred and Max is a competent lawyer engaged with Maria Domenico. When Max meets the confident Irene, he has a troubled love affair with her. In 1933, with the new Banking Act reaches Gino for misapplication of funds. Max plots a plan to help his father but is betrayed by his brothers. Now Max will see his brothers that have also being raised under the motto “Never Forgive, Never Forget”.

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The Sleeping City (1950) George Sherman, Richard Conte, Coleen Gray, Richard Taber, Crime, Film-Noir, Drama

The Sleeping City (1950)
At Bellvue Hospital, New York, an intern is shot in the head by an unknown killer. Inspector Gordon of the 9th Precinct finds no obvious leads but senses an undercurrent of mystery at the hospital; enter Detective Fred Rowan, whose medical background enables him to pose as an intern. Through wheels within wheels, Rowan finally penetrates to a secret, dirty racket…and nurse Ann Sebastian, whom he’s been dating, may be mixed up in it.

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Big Jack (1949) Richard Thorpe, Wallace Beery, Richard Conte, Marjorie Main, Adventure

Big Jack (1949)
Wallace Beery’s final film was the curiously endearing “black comedy” Big Jack. Set in 1820, a time when “science was a crime and crime not yet a science,” the film casts Beery and Marjorie Main as outlaws Big Jack Horner and Flapjack Kate. The two bandits rescue visionary young doctor Alexander Meade (Richard Conte), who is about to be hanged for body-snatching. Meade is a tireless campaigner for modern surgical methods, thus he is forced to steal cadavers for his experiments. Big Jack is only interested in having the doc operate on his injured leg, but pretty soon he too is captivated by Meade’s idealism. The film’s many subplots all come to a head when Meade must prove his surgical theories by performing a delicate operation. Throughout, the film displays a cheerful disregard for the “dignity” of the deceased. One lengthy sequence finds an unbilled Andy Clyde buried alive after being declared legally dead; he laughs uproariously about the misunderstanding, then promptly drinks himself to death! The punchline to this scene occurs when Clyde’s widow finds his remains evenly distributed in several mason jars, whereupon she remarks, “Oh, paw, now they’ve gone and bottled ya!” Vanessa Brown provides the requisite love interest.

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