Tag Archives: spanish

A propósito de Buenos Aires (2006) Manuel Ferrari, Alejo Franzetti, Maria Abadi, Mariana Chaud, Inés Efron, Documentary

A proposito de Buenos Aires (2006)
From the port of Santa Maria of Buenos Aires, the city as a desert where we can not expect mercy or no relief. Black and sound vessels. Orchestral trains. Abandoned children. Lights of methylene blue. Theater lobbies. Broad avenues. Straight narrow streets. Studies outdated. Air collisions. Smokeless chimneys. Identical letters. Furtive encounters. Prefabricated swamps. Slimy beds. Prohibited Islands. Almost a million books. Stone angels. Allegorical stones. Songwriters locals body and soul. Deceptions. Robberies. Scams. Black and white images of a dead Buenos Aires. Eleven directors collective experiment with thirty two characters over a city of five parts: Traps. The money. Desert. Lights. The dead. Temperate and relatives, the remains of a shipwreck: Speaking of Buenos Aires. These young directors met to collaborate on this unusual project, not only for its technical specifications, but for its narrative structure. There are several scenes joined together only by the city. None of these has come to define a unique story, each is part of a larger situation that we see, as if the beginning and end of each story should be completed by the viewer. Or rather, as if there were no need to begin and end because, ultimately, this is nothing more than the conventional way of telling stories.

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The Brides of Fu Manchu (1966) Don Sharp, Christopher Lee, Douglas Wilmer, Heinz Drache, Action, Crime, Horror

The Brides of Fu Manchu (1966)
Christopher Lee returns as Sax Rohmer’s insidious Asian villain Fu Manchu for the second of his five vehicles. This time Fu Manchu and his army of henchmen are kidnaping the daughters of prominent scientists and taking them to his remote island headquarters. Instead of asking for ransom, Fu demands that the fathers help him to build a death ray, which he intends to use to take over the world. But Fu’s archenemy, Nayland Smith of Scotland Yard, is determined not to let that happen…

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American Madness (1932) Frank Capra, Walter Huston, Pat O’Brien, Kay Johnson, Drama

American Madness (1932)
It’s the 1930s, the Depression era, and the Board of Directors of Thomas Dickson’s bank want Dickson to merge with New York Trust and resign. He refuses. One night, Dickson’s bank is robbed of $100,000. The suspect is Matt Brown, an ex-convict whom Dickson hired and appointed Chief Teller. Brown, who’s very loyal to Dickson, refuses to say where he was that night. He actually has two witnesses for his alibi, Mrs. Dickson and fellow worker Cyril Cluett, but Brown is protecting Dickson from finding out that Mrs. Dickson was with Cluett having a romantic evening. Cluett, who has a $50,000 gambling debt, is actually responsible for the robbery, but lets Brown take the rap. Will Brown’s loyalty to Mr. Dickson pay off, or send him back to prison?

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Flying Leathernecks (1951) Nicholas Ray, John Wayne, Robert Ryan, Don Taylor, Drama, War, Action

Flying Leathernecks (1951)
Major Daniel Kirby takes command of a squadron of Marine fliers just before they are about to go into combat. While the men are well meaning, he finds them undisciplined and prone to always finding excuses to do what is easy rather than what is necessary. The root of the problem is the second in command, Capt. Carl ‘Griff’ Griffin. Griff is the best flier in the group but Kirby finds him a poor commander who is not prepared to the difficult decision that all commanders have to make – to put men in harm’s way knowing that they may be killed.

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El hombre robado / The Stolen Man (2007) Matías Piñeiro, Ana Cambre, Francisco García Faure, Daniel Gilman Calderón, Drama

El hombre robado (2007)
Piñeiro’s sparkling debut film breathlessly follows a clever, capricious young woman as she carefully interweaves friends and lovers into an intricate web of secretive yet often unexpectedly compassionate games. Together with her best friend and fellow tour guide at a rival Buenos Aires historical museum, Piñeiro’s headstrong heroine attempts to tame the unpredictable course of her heart, eccentrically drawing inspiration from Sarmiento’s magnum opus, Facundo. With its grainy 16mm black-and-white cinematography, its political sub- and super-texts and its compelling portrait of impetuous youth, The Stolen Man recalls the alternately sober and sprightly nouvelle vague of Jean Eustache and Jacques Rivette.

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