Tag Archives: portuguese subtitles

De Vliegende Hollander / The Flying Dutchman (1995) Jos Stelling, René Groothof, Veerle Dobbelaere, René van ‘t Hof, Comedy, Drama, Fantasy

De Vliegende Hollander (1995)
Late 16th century, persecuted protestantism and general dissatisfaction with the Catholic Habsburg rule in the Netherlands lead to large-scale plundering and vandalizing of churches, only harshening the Spanish Inquisition, sparkling the Eighty Years War. Flanders, 1568: Italian minstrel Campanelli tells he followed a Dutchman, the robber of a golden chalice, but failed to prevent him being taken -after banging a country-girl- by the men of a rigid farmer Netelneck, who has him tied-up inside a huge shit-container. After Campanelli frees him, the gold stays inside, and the Dutchman is killed, but the minstrel turns to offer the paying audience a happier version. Seven years later, he scares the Dutchman’s posthumous son into bringing him food and convinces the kid he can fly, like his dad, who is on a grand ship, but fails to drag the gold out and is blinded and chased by Netelneck.

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Il federale / The Fascist (1961) Luciano Salce, Ugo Tognazzi, Georges Wilson, Gianrico Tedeschi, Comedy

Il federale (1961)
1944. Primo Arcovazzi a fanatic member of Brigate Nere (fascist organization) is in charge to bring an opponent to the regime, Prof. George Wilson, from Abruzzo to Roma. He accepted the mandate because of his wish to be upgraded to “Federale”. They travel by a sidecar trough the disastrous Italy, near to the final collapse, under bombings and in agony. Nevertheless the bad situation, they manage to build up a kind of friendship. Primo, even if the signals of final destruction are near, doesn’t lose his trust in the regime. The end is near.

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Golgotha / Behold the Man (1935) Julien Duvivier, Harry Baur, Jean Gabin, Robert Le Vigan, Adventure, Drama

Golgotha (1935)
Robert le Vigan plays the Son of God, but as often happens in films of this nature he is upstaged by the villains, Herod (Harry Baur), Pontius Pilate (Jean Gabin) and Judas (Lucas Gridoux). All of Jesus’ dialogue is taken directly from the Scriptures, with no movie-style adornments: le Vigan delivers these lines with sincerity and quiet grace. Considering the anti-Semitism prevalent in Europe during the 1930s, the question of the Jews’ responsibility for Jesus’ death is handled with restraint; blame is squarely laid on the shoulders of a handful of conspirators, rather than an entire race.

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