Tag Archives: Otto Kruger

Glamorous Night (1937) Brian Desmond Hurst, Mary Ellis, Otto Kruger, Victor Jory, Drama

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The popular Ivor Novello musical play Glamorous Night was given a conservative film treatment in 1937–minus much of the Novello score that had made it famous. Opera singer Mary Ellis plays an opera singer (why not?) who falls in with a band of roguish but likeable gypsies. Mary manages to convince her Bohemian cohorts to rescue the King from the machinations of his ambitious prime minister. As “cast insurance” to make certain that Glamorous Night would get American bookings, Hollywood character actors Otto Kruger and Victor Jory are given leading roles. The US distributors also sliced the film down from 81 to 65 minutes, through the simple expedient of removing several songs.
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Ever in My Heart (1933) Archie Mayo, Barbara Stanwyck, Otto Kruger, Ralph Bellamy, Drama, Romance, War

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An espionage drama set in the early 20th century, Ever in My Heart stars Barbara Stanwyck as a New England naif who marries a German citizen (Otto Kruger). In 1915, Stanwyck and her husband suffer a brace of blows: The death of their son, and the sinking of the Lusitania, the latter incident sparking a wave of anti-German sentiment. Hounded out of their small town by the angered citizens, Stanwyck and Kruger move to Europe, where the husband voluntarily leaves his wife to join the Kaiser’s army. In 1917, Stanwyck, working as a canteen volunteer in France, discovers that her once pro-American husband is now a German spy. To save him from a firing squad, she poisons his wine, then kills herself.
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Black Eyes / False Rapture (1939) Herbert Brenon, Otto Kruger, Mary Maguire, Walter Rilla, Drama, Romance

Black Eyes - False Rapture (1939)
An embarrassed headwaiter provides the basis for this classical tale set in pre-war Russia. He conceals his lowly profession from his daughter who eventually discovers the truth. Soon after, the father discovers that his daughter has been having sex with a wealthy businessman in one of the restaurant’s private salons in exchange for the money she needs to buy the restaurant.
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Living Dangerously (1936) Herbert Brenon, Otto Kruger, Leonora Corbett, Francis Lister, Crime, Drama, Thriller

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Adapted from a long-running play by Reginald Simpson and Frank Gregory, Living Dangerously stars Otto Kruger as Dr. Norton. Though a pillar of virtue and a highly respected member of the community, Norton has a few unfortunate skeletons in his closet and these are exploited by his blackmailing ex-partner Dr. Pryor (Francis Lister). Unable to persuade Pryor to leave him alone, Norton is left with no alternative but to kill the man. Since audience sympathy is firmly in Norton’s corner, one half hopes that he’ll get away with his entirely justifiable crime –-and for a while, it looks like he will! Living Dangerously was one of the last directorial efforts by former spectacle specialist Herbert Brenon.
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Chained (1934) Clarence Brown, Joan Crawford, Clark Gable, Otto Kruger, Drama, Romance

Chained (1934)
Richard Field is a successful businessman who has become romantically involved with younger employee Diane Lovering, but he is unable to persuade his grasping wife to grant him a divorce out of his dysfunctional marriage. Diane meets dashing rancher Mike Bradley through his wise-cracking pal Johnnie on a South American ocean voyage, and they begin a shipboard romance that carries over to his Argentinian ranch. Diane decides to return to New York and tell Richard in person that she intends to marry Mike Bradley. When Diane gets there Richard surprises her with a wedding ring and the morning newspaper citing Mrs. Field is in Reno obtaining a divorce. Richard had to agree not only to a large monetary settlement but was forbidden to see his sons. Diane didn’t have the heart to tell Richard about Mike and decides to marry him. Diane writes a “Dear John letter” to Mike explaining a calculated mercenary decision that she prefers the position and financial status that Field’s can offer her …
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The Big Boss (1941) Charles Barton, Otto Kruger, Gloria Dickson, John Litel

The Big Boss (1941)
The Big Boss is Jim Maloney (Otto Kruger), who pulls all the political strings in an unnamed major metropolis. Maloney’s chief antagonist is scrupulously honest “reform” governor Bob Dugan (John Litel). The fact that Maloney and Dugan are actually brothers, orphaned in childhood and raised separately, adds both texture and poignancy to their current adversarial relationship. Intending to reveal his fraternal ties to Dugan at a crucial moment in the latter’s anti-corruption campaign, Maloney is ultimately defeated by the forces of Righteousness. Outside of the always dependable Otto Kruger and John Litel, the film’s best performance is delivered by the underrated Gloria Dickson as a fairly realistic newspaperwoman.
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