Tag Archives: Mark Sandrich

So Proudly We Hail! (1943) Mark Sandrich, Claudette Colbert, Paulette Goddard, Veronica Lake, Drama, Romance, War

So Proudly We Hail! (Mark Sandrich, 1943)
A group of U.S. Army nurses leaves San Francisco for their tour of duty in Hawaii in December 1941. The attack on Pearl Harbor changes their destination, and their lives. Sent to Bataan, in the Philippines, the nurses are led by Lt. Janet Davidson. She is faced with untested nurses who expected an easy time in Honolulu, but who quickly become battle-weary veterans dealing with daily bombardments by the Japanese, overwhelmed by the numbers of wounded, and dwindling supplies. Some of “Davey’s” unit also have to deal with romantic entanglements with men they met onboard ship. When Bataan falls, the American forces flee to the offshore island of Corregidor, where they find the Japanese assault just as intense.

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Hips, Hips, Hooray! (1934) Mark Sandrich, Bert Wheeler, Robert Woolsey, Ruth Etting, Comedy, Musical

Hips, Hips, Hooray! (1934)
Todd stars as Amelia Frisby, the owner of a beauty supply business. Andy Williams (Wheeler) and Dr. Bob Dudley (Woolsey) convince her to hire them as salesman to promote her new flavored lipstick, and hilarity ensues. The film features Etting singing “Keep Romance Alive” and Bert Wheeler and Dorothy Lee singing “Keep On Doin’ What You’re Doin'” by Bert Kalmar and Harry Ruby.

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A Woman Rebels (1936) Mark Sandrich, Katharine Hepburn, Herbert Marshall, Elizabeth Allan, Drama, History, Romance

A Woman Rebels (1936)
The story revolves around Pamela, as a woman in late-1800’s England who has no intention of marriage and wishes to be her own person. After a great deal of difficulty in finding a job, she finally lands a position at a “woman’s” magazine, which covered topics such as sewing and cooking. After the editor takes sick, she moves the magazine into discussing issues of gender equality, child labor, medical care, and finding a job. She then finds herself as the unexpected leader of a movement. After an unexpected event, she is also faced with raising a child without a father, which people at that time thought was scandalous.

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