Tag Archives: Marjorie Main

The Bugle Sounds (1942) S. Sylvan Simon, Richard Thorpe, Wallace Beery, Marjorie Main, Lewis Stone, Drama, War

The Bugle Sounds 1942
Sergeant “Hap” Doan, heartbroken that the Nineteenth Cavalry, in which he has served for so many years, is to be mechanized and replenished with twenty recent draftees, goes on a drinking spree. He rails about leaving the Army, but is there when the draftees arrive, ready to make good soldiers out of them. When his horse, Cantigny, is killed by the explosion of a tank that had been sabotaged by Nazi-agents, he goes AWOL, and is court-martialed upon his return and given a dishonorable discharge. But he is under secret orders from his Commanding Officer to join the gang of German spies, who have every reason to believe they can trust the disgruntled ex-sergeant..
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Mrs. O’Malley and Mr. Malone (1950) Norman Taurog, Marjorie Main, James Whitmore, Ann Dvorak, Comedy, Mystery

Mrs. O'Malley and Mr. Malone (1950)
“Murder-on-the-train” mystery has lawyer Malone chasing his paroled embezzler client (Kepplar) who still hasn’t paid Malone’s fee. When Kepplar jumps parole on a train to Chicago, Malone follows, in company with Kepplar’s ex-wife, a police inspector and Mrs. O’Malley, a hearty radio contest winner from Montana. Kepplar is murdered, and a game of musical corpses commences, with hijinks in coach corridors as Malone and Hattie search for the killer.
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Big Jack (1949) Richard Thorpe, Wallace Beery, Richard Conte, Marjorie Main, Adventure

Big Jack (1949)
Wallace Beery’s final film was the curiously endearing “black comedy” Big Jack. Set in 1820, a time when “science was a crime and crime not yet a science,” the film casts Beery and Marjorie Main as outlaws Big Jack Horner and Flapjack Kate. The two bandits rescue visionary young doctor Alexander Meade (Richard Conte), who is about to be hanged for body-snatching. Meade is a tireless campaigner for modern surgical methods, thus he is forced to steal cadavers for his experiments. Big Jack is only interested in having the doc operate on his injured leg, but pretty soon he too is captivated by Meade’s idealism. The film’s many subplots all come to a head when Meade must prove his surgical theories by performing a delicate operation. Throughout, the film displays a cheerful disregard for the “dignity” of the deceased. One lengthy sequence finds an unbilled Andy Clyde buried alive after being declared legally dead; he laughs uproariously about the misunderstanding, then promptly drinks himself to death! The punchline to this scene occurs when Clyde’s widow finds his remains evenly distributed in several mason jars, whereupon she remarks, “Oh, paw, now they’ve gone and bottled ya!” Vanessa Brown provides the requisite love interest.
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