Tag Archives: Lothar Mendes

The Walls Came Tumbling Down (1946) Lothar Mendes, Lee Bowman, Marguerite Chapman, Edgar Buchanan, Action, Adventure, Crime, Mystery, Romance

The Walls Came Tumbling Down (1946)
The Columbia mystery melodrama The Walls Came Tumbling Down is regarded in many circles as star Lee Bowman’s finest hour-and-a-half. Bowman is cast as Winchellesque Broadway columnist Gilbert Archer, who insists upon investigating the death of an old friend, a priest. The police insist that the priest hanged himself, but Archer believes otherwise, and together with Boston socialite Patricia Foster (Marguerite Chapman) he begins to play detective – though “play” is hardly the word. Key ingredients to the mystery are two rare Bibles and a painting of the fall of Jericho. The principal villainy comes at the grubby hands of Columbia contractees George Macready and Edgar Buchanan, while J. Edward Bromberg has a few amusing moments as a kooky art dealer.
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Flight for Freedom (1943) Lothar Mendes, Rosalind Russell, Fred MacMurray, Herbert Marshall, Biography, Drama

Flight for Freedom (1943)
Fictionalized biography of Amelia Earhart (here called Tonie Carter). First, a flagwaving preface about air warfare in the Pacific; then flashing back to her first solo flight in 1932; whirlwind romance with sexist ace pilot Randy Britton; advanced training; a transcontinental race; world fame; first, aborted round-the-world flight; and her famous disappearance. This film popularized the theory that Earhart’s disappearance was connected with secret work for the U.S. Navy.
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The Man Who Could Work Miracles (1936) Lothar Mendes, Alexander Korda, Roland Young, Ralph Richardson, Edward Chapman, Comedy, Fantasy

The Man Who Could Work Miracles (1936)
George McWhirter Fotheringay, while vigorously asserting the impossibility of miracles, suddenly discovers that he can perform them. After being thrown out of a bar for what is thought to be a trick, he tests his powers and eventually sends a policeman to Hades by accident. Worried, he sends the police officer to San Francisco, and seeks advice from the local clergyman, Mr Maydig. Maydig, after having Fotheringay’s powers demonstrated to him, quickly planning for reform of the world by means of miracle, but eventually Fotheringay orders a miracle which, due to clumsy wording, backfires. He relinquishes his power and returns to the time before he had it.
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