Tag Archives: Claude Rich

Revenge of the Musketeers / La fille de d’Artagnan (1994) Bertrand Tavernier, Sophie Marceau, Philippe Noiret, Claude Rich, Action, Adventure, Comedy

Revenge of the Musketeers (1994)
The story begins on the autumn of 1654 in South France. Eloise lives in a cloister. Her famous father left her there. The young lady is enthusiastic about honour, faithfulness, affection to the poor people, and life of course. She seems powerless when the leader of the nuns is executed because she tried to save an unlucky servant who escaped from odious Crassac and his evil Muse, the Red Lady. Eloise is seized with a fit of temper.

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Mata Hari, agent H21 (1964) Jean-Louis Richard, Jeanne Moreau, Jean-Louis Trintignant, Claude Rich, Drama, History, Romance

Mata Hari, agent H21 (Jean-Louis Richard, 1964)
This French version of the notorious spy’s life centers less on her romantic escapades, and more on those that reveal the person she actually was during WW I when her German superiors ordered her to seduce the French captain Trintignant so she can steal classified papers from him. Instead she falls in love with him, blows the cover, and ends up convicted of espionage and shot.

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Le Crabe-Tambour / Drummer-Crab (1977) Pierre Schoendoerffer, Jean Rochefort, Claude Rich, Jacques Perrin, Adventure, Drama, War

Le Crabe-Tambour (1977)
A dying French naval frigate captain tries to make a last rendezvous in the winter storm-tossed seas off the Grand Banks, with “le crab tambour,” a French war hero he had betrayed twenty years earlier. “Le crab tambour” the drummer crab” was a boyhood nickname for the handsome young Alsatian whom the film depicts proving his courage, first in the war in French Indochina, and then again in the “Generals’ Revolt” in Algeria. Courtmartialed because friends like the French naval captain were afraid to risk their own careers by testifying for him, the exiled “crab tambour” and his trawler, The Shamrock, is now a legend among the Grand Banks fishermen.

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