Tag Archives: 1930s

Internes Can’t Take Money (1937) Alfred Santell, Barbara Stanwyck, Joel McCrea, Lloyd Nolan, Crime, Drama, Romance

Internes Can't Take Money (1937)
In a fantastically art-deco hospital, young Dr. Kildare treats and falls for impoverished Janet Healy, widow of a bank robber, who’s been in prison and can’t find her baby. Later she helps Kildare sew up gangster Hanlon in a tavern back room. Kildare pursues Janet and enlists Hanlon to help her; the gangster’s solution, not surprisingly, is violent.
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There’s Always a Woman (1938) Alexander Hall, Joan Blondell, Melvyn Douglas, Mary Astor, Comedy, Mystery

There's Always a Woman (1938)
An investigator for the District Attorney’s office quits to open his own detective agency. However, business is so bad that he finally decides to give it up and go back to his old job. As his wife is at his office closing up, a wealthy society matron walks in with a case: she wants to know if her husband is having an affair with his ex-girlfriend, who is now married. The wife accepts what looks to be an easy case, figuring than she can then persuade her husband to re-start the agency. However, when the client’s husband is found murdered, she decides to investigate the murder herself. Her husband has also been assigned by the D.A. to investigate the murder, and he doesn’t know that his wife is also on the case.
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Rasputin and the Empress (1932) Richard Boleslawski, John Barrymore, Ethel Barrymore, Lionel Barrymore, Drama, History

Rasputin and the Empress (1932)
As Europe looms on the edge of war in 1913, the family and members of the court of the Russian czar Nicholas come under the sway of a mysterious mystic named Rasputin. When Rasputin miraculously appears to cure the czar’s son Alyosha of his hemophilia, the monk’s reputation is cemented, particularly in the mind of the princess Natasha. Natasha’s fiancé (and, later, husband) Prince Paul Chegodieff, however, suspects Rasputin is a charlatan who will cause the downfall of the royal family and perhaps of Russia itself.
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